Chernobyl Disaster in 1986

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Chernobyl: The worst nuclear accident in history.


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Watch this shocking Chernobyl video footage of the 1986 nuclear incident...


The Chernobyl Incident

The Chernobyl disaster in 1986 was the worst nuclear accident until the in 2011. These are the only two nuclear incidents in the history of nuclear power that have been recorded to be a Level 7 event on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Although the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster was a direct result of natural catastrophe (earthquake and the following tsunami), The Chernobyl Incident was a result of a failed experiment.

The Chernobyl nuclear plant had been operating with a few lapses in safety and security. There was a serious compromise in power backups of the nuclear reactors. Technically, the nuclear reactors need to be cooled down even after a power disruption and even if they are not generating any power, to remove decay heat (released as a result of radioactive decay).

chernobyl disaster in 1986
Schoolchildren wearing gas masks during nuclear safety training lessons in Ukraine. AP photo by Sergey Ponomarev.

At , in case of a power disruption, the backup generators should be able to offer the desired power to run the main cooling water pump, which would then cool the reactors and the core, after a minute to about seventy five seconds from being started. This time lapse was certainly not acceptable by any means of safety and backup standards.

It was thought of that the steam turbine at the plant could be used to generate power and support the cooling systems until the diesel generators started operating to full capacity. The theory was sound since the rotational energy of the turbine could well use the residual steam to generate electricity; however, when the experiment was run with the fourth nuclear reactor, there was an unprecedented surge in output power and the core exploded.


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 Part 1 of 1986 Chernobyl Disaster. For Full Screen, click the brackets at the bottom of the video.




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 Part 2 of The Chernobyl Disaster. For Full Screen, click the brackets at the bottom of the video.




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 Part 3 of The Chernobyl Incident. For Full Screen, click the brackets at the bottom of the video.




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 Part 4 of 1986 Chernobyl Disaster. For Full Screen, click the brackets at the bottom of the video.




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 Part 5 of Chernobyl Nuclear Accident. For Full Screen, click the brackets at the bottom of the video.




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 Part 6 of Chernobyl Disaster in 1986. For Full Screen, click the brackets at the bottom of the video.




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 Part 7 of The Chernobyl Incident. For Full Screen, click the brackets at the bottom of the video.




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 Part 8 of 1986 Chernobyl Disaster. For Full Screen, click the brackets at the bottom of the video.




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 Part 9 of Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster. For Full Screen, click the brackets at the bottom of the video.




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 Part 10 of Chernobyl Disaster in 1986. For Full Screen, click the brackets at the bottom of the video.



The Chernobyl disaster in 1986 has been considered to be the worst man-made nuclear disaster in history. Although the initial reports of casualties were as low as 31 people -- who died from direct radiation exposure, almost a million people where killed worldwide in the years to come -- according to "Chernobyl," a Russian publication. The former number of casualties was directly associated with the plant (workers) while the latter has been consequential deaths from cancer and several health issues that were caused by the exposure to radioactive substances.

Some scientists argue that Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011 may be worse than the 1986 Chernobyl incident because the air contamination was 300 times that of Chernobyl. Even if only two workers died inside the Fukushima plant, scientists predict that one million lives will be lost to cancer in the years to come.

The Chernobyl nuclear incident did not just make the city of uninhabitable, but also crumbled the Soviet economy. It is said that Ukraine and Russia are still bearing the costs for treatment, decontamination and other aspects associated with the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in 1986. The soil and the water in contaminated areas nearby Chernobyl still contain substantial levels of radioactivity, and will continue to harm humans for decades to come.


Did you know? The world now has over 400 nuclear reactors and of these, 100 are in the United States alone. Share this story on Facebook with your friends.



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